Workshops and Presentations that pick up where the book leaves off

If you were to ask me about the workshops I conduct, I would reply I actually do four, inter-connected ones that easily can be delivered as 60- to 90-minute stand-alones, or mixed and matched into a longer half-day, full-day, or even multi-day curriculum:

  • Five Ways to Build Trust with Clients and Colleagues;
  • Formulating a Brief that Drives Great Creative;
  • How To Run a Meeting, Brief a Colleague, Write a Conference Report, and Formulate and Give a PowerPoint Presentation; and,
  • Client Disasters, Agency Meltdowns, and How to Address Them. 

Five Ways to Build Trust with Clients and Colleagues serves as a highly effective distillation of what is a nearly a 300-page book, compressing its lessons into five principles:

  • Show up;
  • Follow up;
  • Speak up;
  • Make it up; and,
  • Straighten up.

Many of the workshops I conduct are for smaller shops, digitally native ones, or both, where Planners are either in short supply or missing altogether, which means agencies have to rely on an amalgamation of ad hoc staffers – Account people, Project Management staffers, even Media experts – to craft Creative Briefs. Section Five of The Art of Client Service is called “Formulating a Brief That Drives Great Creative,” and I’ve borrowed this as the workshop title.  I love presenting Formulating a Brief that Drives Great Creative, given I too am an Account weenie and not a Planner, so people can relate, plus it allows me to share and deconstruct a couple of broadcast spots, which always is great fun.

I wrote How To Run a Meeting, Brief a Colleague, Write a Conference Report, and Formulate and Give a PowerPoint Presentation in response to an agency request, given the shop really needed a tutorial on “How To,” and I was the person to deliver this, given Section Four of the book includes eight chapters on this very subject.

I figured people might learn best if they heard me confess to some of the worst screw-ups I perpetrated as an account person, so I’ve extracted five such stories that I recount as problem/solution case histories in Client Disasters, Agency Meltdowns, and How to Address Them. 

Usually my workshop clients will find one or more of these topics of interest, but in the rare event they don’t, I easily can create new content based on a challenge they articulate.  The fact is, I’ve been doing this for more years than I care to admit, and to paraphrase a famous insurance commercial, “I know some stuff, because I’ve seen some stuff.”

My fees for conducting workshops are surprisingly reasonable; if this is of interest, feel free to get in touch with me at robert@solomonstrategic.com to learn more.